da Vinci Robotic-Assisted Surgery as a Minimally Invasive Option for Patients

Audubon Surgery Center is thrilled to introduce the latest advancement in surgical technology – the da Vinci robotic-assisted surgery. With a track record spanning three decades, this cutting-edge technology is designed for hospitals and ASCs dedicated to enhancing the scope and effectiveness of minimally invasive procedures.

Experience the excellence of da Vinci robotic surgical systems, meticulously crafted from nearly three decades of expertise in seamlessly integrating robotics technology with advanced software. Our commitment is to provide precision, unparalleled vision, and enhanced control for a superior surgical experience. Choose Audubon Surgery Center for state-of-the-art robotic-assisted surgery, setting a new standard in healthcare innovation.

Urology

Radical Prostatectomy

What is a radical prostatectomy?

A radical prostatectomy is surgery to remove your prostate gland and nearby tissue as well as any lymph nodes, if necessary.

Minimally invasive prostatectomy

Surgeons can perform a prostatectomy through open surgery or a minimally invasive approach. Traditional open surgery requires a long incision in your abdomen. During open surgery, the surgeon looks directly at the surgical area through the incision and removes the prostate gland using hand-held tools.

There are two minimally invasive approaches to prostate surgery: laparoscopic surgery and robotic-assisted surgery, possibly with da Vinci technology.

Both minimally invasive surgical options require a few small incisions that doctors use to insert surgical instruments and a camera for viewing. In laparoscopic surgery, doctors use special long-handled tools while viewing magnified images from a laparoscope (camera) on a video screen.

Sacral Colpopexy, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery

You deserve special care

The muscles and connective tissues supporting your pelvic organs (uterus, bladder, and rectum) can weaken, causing the organs to slip down (prolapse) from their usual positions. When pelvic organ prolapse occurs symptoms may include pressure or discomfort in your pelvic area, a bulge in your vagina, tissue moving out of your vagina, and urinary incontinence. Pelvic organ prolapse is surprisingly common. Between 3 and 6 percent of women notice symptoms, and vaginal examinations show that up to 50 percent of women have some degree of pelvic organ prolapse. 

To diagnose pelvic organ prolapse, your doctor may ask you for your medical history and may do a vaginal and rectal exam, either while you are laying down, standing, or both. You may be asked to cough during the exam to see if you leak urine and you may be checked to see how completely your bladder empties.

Understanding your options

If you’ve been diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse, your doctor may recommend a wait-and-see approach, lifestyle changes, exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, or a removable vaginal device that supports pelvic organs called a pessary.1 If none of these options provide adequate symptom relief, your doctor may recommend surgery. There are two types of surgery for pelvic organ prolapse: obliterative surgery and reconstructive surgery.1 Obliterative surgery narrows or closes off the vagina to provide support for prolapsed organs. 

Reconstructive pelvic organ prolapse repair surgery aims to hold the organs in their correct locations. During surgery, the surgeon moves the organs back to their original positions and may implant a surgical mesh support to keep the organs from moving. 

Surgeons can perform pelvic organ prolapse repair surgery using traditional open surgery, which requires a long incision (cut), or through minimally invasive surgery. In traditional open surgery, the surgeon looks directly at the surgical area through the incision and performs the repair using hand-held tools. 

There are three types of minimally invasive approaches: vaginal, laparoscopic, or robotic-assisted surgery, possibly with da Vinci technology.

A vaginal surgery is when the entire procedure is done through the vagina and there are no incisions (cuts) on your abdomen. Doctors perform minimally invasive laparoscopic or robotic-assisted surgeries through a few small incisions in the abdomen. To perform a laparoscopic procedure, surgeons use special long-handled tools while viewing magnified images from the laparoscope (camera) on a video screen.

General Surgery

Inguinal Hernia Repair

Inguinal Hernia Repair

If you’ve been diagnosed with an inguinal (or groin) hernia and your doctor recommends surgical repair, you’re not alone. About 800,000 inguinal hernia repairs are performed in the United States each year.1 An inguinal hernia happens when tissue, most often part of the intestine, bulges through a weak area of abdominal muscle in the groin area. Inguinal hernias make up about 75 percent of all hernias and are most common in men.

Understanding your options:

Doctors sometimes recommend watchful waiting if the hernia is small and there are few or no symptoms, but surgery is the only way doctors can repair an inguinal hernia.3 In all surgery types, the surgeon repairs the weakness in abdominal wall and, in most cases, reinforces it with some type of surgical mesh to prevent the hernia from recurring.

Surgeons can repair inguinal hernias with traditional open surgery, which requires a large incision in your abdomen, or a minimally invasive approach. In traditional open surgery, the surgeon looks directly at the surgical area through the incision and repairs the hernia using hand-held tools.

There are two minimally invasive approaches: laparoscopic surgery and robotic-assisted surgery, possibly with da Vinci technology.

Surgeons perform minimally invasive laparoscopic or robotic-assisted surgeries through a few small incisions. To perform a laparoscopic hernia repair, surgeons use special long-handled tools while viewing magnified images from the laparoscope (camera) on a video screen.

Why surgery with da Vinci?

A review of published studies suggests potential benefits of an inguinal hernia repair with da Vinci technology include:

  • Patients who had an inguinal hernia repair with da Vinci had a lower rate of complications after surgery from the time they left the hospital through 30 days after surgery compared with patients who had an open procedure.
  • Although fewer than 1 in 10 inguinal hernia repairs requires an admission to the hospital, called an inpatient stay, patients who had an inguinal hernia repair with da Vinci technology stayed in the hospital as an inpatient for a shorter amount of time than patients with similar characteristics who had an open procedure.

Ventral Hernia Repair

Get back to what matters most

Every year, surgeons in the U.S. perform between 350,000 and 500,000 ventral hernia repairs.

A ventral hernia happens when tissue pushes through an opening in your abdominal muscles, creating a visible bulge or tender area. Depending on where the hernia appears and what causes it, doctors may refer to a ventral or abdominal hernia by other names. The most common types of ventral hernias can happen at the site of an earlier surgical incision (incisional hernia), near your belly button (umbilical hernia), or above your belly button (epigastric hernia).

When a hernia appears, doctors sometimes recommend watchful waiting, but surgery is the only way to repair a hernia.3 In all repairs, surgeons reposition the abdominal muscle over the bulging tissue and, in most cases, reinforce the muscle with some type of surgical mesh to prevent the hernia from recurring.

Some ventral hernias may require a more complex repair, which is when the surgeon has to separate and restructure the abdominal wall muscle.

Surgeons can repair ventral hernias with traditional open surgery, which requires a large incision in your abdomen, or a minimally invasive approach. In traditional open surgery, the surgeon looks directly at the surgical area through the incision and repairs the hernia using hand-held tools.

There are two minimally invasive approaches: laparoscopic surgery and robotic-assisted surgery, possibly with da Vinci technology.

Surgeons perform minimally invasive laparoscopic or robotic-assisted surgeries through a few small incisions. To perform a laparoscopic hernia repair, surgeons use special long-handled tools while viewing magnified images from the laparoscope (camera) on a video screen.

Why surgery with da Vinci?

Data from a nationally based registry suggest potential benefits of ventral hernia repair using da Vinci technology include:

  • Patients who underwent a complex ventral hernia repair with da Vinci stayed in the hospital for less time than patients who underwent an open procedure.
  • Patients who had a da Vinci procedure for non-complex ventral hernia repair stayed in the hospital for less time than patients who had a laparoscopic repair.
  • Patients who had a ventral hernia repair with da Vinci went to their doctor’s clinic fewer times within the first 30 days after their procedure than patients who underwent an open procedure.

Gallbladder Surgery / Cholecystectomy

Get back to what matters most

Your gallbladder is a small organ that stores bile, a digestive juice your liver produces to break down fat in food. After you eat, the gallbladder releases stored bile into your small intestine through narrow tubes called ducts. Gallbladders can become inflamed (called cholecystitis) and ducts can be blocked, often because of small hard masses called gallstones that form, producing symptoms that range from mild discomfort to intense pain.

Why surgery with da Vinci?

Robotic-assisted surgery with a da Vinci system gives surgeons access to technology features that include:
  • A high-definition 3D camera system with high magnification that provides immersive viewing of the gallbladder and surrounding area.
  • Firefly fluorescence imaging which offers visualization beyond the human eye by activating injected dye to light up and clearly show the gallbladder and surrounding structures, including the ducts.
  • Da Vinci Single-Site technology, which allows surgeons to make just one incision near the belly button, providing patients with nearly scarless results.

Bariatric Surgery

Gastric Sleeves

Bariatric Surgery

Learn about a minimally invasive option for bariatric surgery. Common bariatric procedures include gastric bypass surgery (roux-enY gastric bypass or RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy, also known as gastric sleeve.

Understanding your options

There are many ways to lose weight that you can explore with your doctor, such as diet, exercise, medication, and surgery. If you’re considering bariatric surgery, your surgeon should discuss your options with you. Surgery alone is not enough. You must follow the recommendations from your healthcare team after surgery for you to make a lasting change.

Sleeve gastrectomy, or gastric sleeve surgery, reduces your stomach size by about 80 percent to limit the amount of food it can hold. You may lose weight because you can only eat small amounts of food. Sleeve gastrectomy may result in changes in stomach hormones to reduce appetite and increase fullness.

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), or gastric bypass, reduces your stomach size while also rerouting your small intestine to decrease food absorption. You may lose weight by eating less and absorbing fewer calories. By changing the amount your stomach can hold and the way food passes through your body, gastric bypass decreases hunger, increases fullness, and changes hormones that may affect your metabolism and weight.

Minimally invasive bariatric surgery

Surgeons commonly perform bariatric surgery through a few small incisions using minimally invasive techniques—either laparoscopic or robotic. To perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery, surgeons use special long-handled tools while viewing magnified images from the laparoscope (camera) on a video screen. Robotic bariatric surgery is described below.

Both sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass surgeries can be performed with robotic-assisted surgery using da Vinci technology. With the da Vinci system, your surgeon sits at a console near you in the operating room. Through the console, the surgeon controls a camera and the tiny instruments used to perform your surgery through a few incisions about the size of your fingertip.

The system delivers 3D high-definition views, giving your surgeon a crystal-clear view of the surgical area magnified 10 times what the human eye sees. It translates every movement your surgeon makes in real time, bending and rotating instruments that move like a human hand, but with a greater range of motion. Built-in tremor filtration technology helps your surgeon move each instrument with smooth precision.

Gynecology

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy

Learn about a minimally invasive option for hysterectomy. Common procedures include partial hysterectomy, simple or total hysterectomy, and radical hysterectomy.

You deserve special care

A hysterectomy is surgery to remove the uterus, and possibly the ovaries and fallopian tubes. There are several conditions that may prompt your doctor to recommend a hysterectomy. They range from benign (noncancerous) conditions, like endometriosis or fibroids, to cancer conditions, like endometrial or uterine cancer. While the number of women who receive hysterectomies has declined over the last several decades, approximately 400,000 women in the U.S. still receive hysterectomies each year.

On this page, you’ll find an overview of the types of hysterectomies, information on how hysterectomies are performed, and more.

What is the removal of the uterus?

There are several types of hysterectomy: partial hysterectomy, simple or total hysterectomy and radical hysterectomy. Your surgeon will discuss what they recommend. This may vary based on your condition, symptoms, and age. If you have cancer, the doctor will also consider the type of cancer you have, its location, and progression.

Partial hysterectomy is a procedure to remove the upper part of the uterus. Your ovaries and fallopian tubes may or may not be removed. This procedure is typically used for benign conditions

Simple or total hysterectomy is a procedure to remove the uterus and cervix. Your ovaries and fallopian tubes may or may not be removed. Depending on your condition, additional surrounding tissue, like lymph nodes, may also be removed.

Radical hysterectomy is a procedure to remove the uterus, cervix, and part of the vagina. Radical hysterectomies are used most often for procedures where cancer is or is suspected to be present. Often, additional surrounding tissue, like lymph nodes, are also removed. The ovaries and fallopian tubes may or may not be removed.

Minimally invasive hysterectomy

Traditionally, surgeons performed hysterectomy through open surgery, which requires a large incision in your belly. The surgeon looks directly at the surgical area through the large incision and removes the uterus using hand-held tools.

It is becoming increasingly common for surgeons to offer minimally invasive hysterectomy. Minimally invasive procedures require either one or a few small incisions on your abdomen.

There are three types of minimally invasive approaches: vaginal hysterectomy, laparoscopic hysterectomy, or robotic-assisted surgery, possibly with da Vinci technology. Vaginal hysterectomy removes the uterus through an incision in your vagina. Doctors perform minimally invasive laparoscopic or robotic-assisted surgeries through a few small incisions or a single small incision near the belly button. To perform a laparoscopic hysterectomy, surgeons use special long-handled tools while viewing magnified images from the laparoscope (camera) on a video screen.

Robotic hysterectomy surgery is described below.

Both simple and radical hysterectomy can be performed with robotic-assisted surgery using da Vinci technology. The da Vinci system is a tool used for surgery, but it does not treat cancer. The system extends surgeon capabilities within minimally invasive surgery.

The da Vinci system makes it possible to perform surgery through a few small incisions about the size of your fingertip. With the da Vinci system, your surgeon sits at a console near you in the operating room. The console enables your surgeon to control a camera and the tiny instruments used to perform your surgery.

The system delivers 3D high-definition views, giving your surgeon a crystal-clear view of the surgical area magnified 10 times what the human eye sees. It translates every movement your surgeon makes in real time, bending and rotating instruments that move like a human hand, but with a greater range of motion. Built-in tremor filtration technology helps your surgeon move each instrument with smooth precision.

 

Sisters Grove Pavilion at St Francis Medical Center

Phone: (719) 355-3400

Fax: (719) 355-3398

6011 E Woodmen Rd, Suite 200, Colorado Springs, CO 80923